Author name: Gayle D

Crinum pedunculatum Swamp or River Lily

Also known as River Lily, this plant is very hard and adaptable – shade to full sun, pots or in the ground, dry to soggy soils.  Strong green strappy leaves with a large, delicate flower, popular with the native bees. The original plant was bought as tubestock from Kumbartcho, and has been moved several times.

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Doryanthes excelsa – Gymea Lilly

First flower winter 2020.  It’s taking so long to open. Once the flower opens it is popular with the native bees and the honeyeaters. This is in the front garden on the mound so well-drained and quite dry. Tussock plant with sword-like leaves to 1 Metre high Aspect: Full Sun / Semi-Shade Soil/Conditions: Moist /

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Walking from North West Hospital to Everton Park Shopping Centre

This walk would normally take about 20 minutes. It was very hot so I walked slower and paused under trees to check my map, taking almost 40 minutes. That is where the phone is invaluable when walking. Like many Brisbane suburbs, Everton Park is not built on a grid system. Take a wrong turn while

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Cullen tenax – Emu foot

Atractive nitrogen-fixing vine with common name of Wild or Native Lucerne Attracts Chequered Swallowtail, Common grass-blue and the Tailed pea-blue butterflies Small purple flowers attract native bees. I got the tubestock from Kumbartcho Nursery and put it in this hanging pot and forgot about it. Transplanted December 2019 in front of pond near the bee

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Hovea acutifolia

Also known as purple pea bush “A small to medium evergreen Australian shrub that gets small 1cm purple flowers in Aug to Sept. Leaves are green on top with a golden brown underside.” Bought tubestock Kumbartcho March 2019 and struggling in the dry bed against the east wall (water it more), another tubestock bought December

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Glochidion sumatranum (umbrella cheese tree)

Common names: Cheesetree; Pin Flower Tree; Sumatran Buttonwood; Umbrella Cheesetree; Buttonwood White flowers, cheese shaped greenish pink seed capsules & red bird attracting seeds Tree to 15 m high (keep it in a pot) Tubestock from Kumbartcho December 2019. Planted in brown square pot with Brachyscome multifida and Viola banksii below.

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Mentha satureioides – Bush Mint

Bush Mint sometimes referred to as “Native Pennyroyal” Mat-forming herb, rhizomatous and often producing ascending to prostrate branches at nodes; branches glabrous or covered with short spreading hairs. Grows in sandy-clay to clay-rich soils, frequently in grassy areas Sun or shade, attracts bees & insects. Tiny, white flowers will attract bees in summer. The plant

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Ozothamnus diosmifolius – Rice Flower

Common names: Sago Bush, Rice Flower, White Dogwood, Pill Flower Shrub to 2.5 Metres High by 2 Metres Spread Full Sun / Semi-Shade, Adaptable Description: Dense Upright Habit Evergreen Perennial Dark Green aromatic leaves to 15 mm long White flowers in 3 mm clusters of 20 to 100 in Spring to Summer Attracts Australian Painted

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Glycosmis trifolata – Pink Lime Bush

Glycosmis trifoliata – known as Òrange Berry or Pink Lime Bush Rounded open habit, evergreen, perennial shrub to 4 Metres Full Sun / Semi-Shade Moist /Well-Drained Green glossy leaves to 15 cm long White flowers to 5 mm in clusters in Spring to Summer Pink soft berry fruit to 12 mm diameter Family: Rutaceae Natural Habitat: Dry

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Graptophyllum spinigerum “Spiny Fuchsia”

Also known as Queensland Holly or Veiny Graptophyllum Understory plant in Wet Sclerophyll Forest (Full Shade / Filtered Sun but will tolerate full sun) A compact rounded shrub with attractive dark green leaves, and white flowers in Spring. The fruit is club-shaped and about 1cm. long. Attracts Carpenter Bee, Blue-banded Bee and stingless bees. Tubestock

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Spartothamnella juncea

Endemic to Queensland and New South Wales. Common names are Native Broom, Square-stemmed Broom or Bead Bush Evergreen perennial shrub to 1.5 Metres High, Full Sun / Semi-shade Almost leafless with tiny white 5-petalled flowers, orange / red globular fruit most of the year Dry Rainforest said to attract birds but I will be watching to

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Cissus antarctica (Kangaroo Vine)

Tubestock from Kumbartcho Nursery December 2019 Label says: Scrambling / Climbing Woody Vine or Ground Cover to 5 Metres, Evergreen Perennial, Bright Green leaves to 12 cm, Yellowish flowers to 5mm, Purplish-Black grape-like edible fruit Semi-Shade / Shade Soil/Conditions: Moist / Well-Drained Joseph’s Coat Moth Host Plant Bird Attracting Hanging Basket plant Indoor Plant Aboriginal

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Eremophila oppositifolia “Moonlight” white form of the oppositifolia emu bush

Eremophila oppositifolia is a subtle shrub, not showy like the grevilleas or the wattles, but it is one the draws the most admiration from visitors. This one lives at the top of a slope, with little care and attention. It flowers in late autumn and early spring. The little brown honey eaters hang from the

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Goodenia ovata – yellow flowers on an unassuming but attractive plant

Although Goodenia ovata is often described as a small, open shrub, it grows as a ground cover on the verge. It’s extremely hardy and always seems to have cheerful yellow flowers.The leaves are glossy green with a serrated edge. Bought as tube stock from Kumbartcho Nursery A second Goodenia bought from Plant Shack in August 2018.

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Dianella brevipendunctulata – Blue Flax-Lily

Dianella berries (November 2018) on front verge. Rich purple berries follow delicate flowers. Bought as tubestock (3), Kumbartcho, December 2016. Planted on west side of tank. Bought as tubestock (30), Kumbartcho, December 2016. Planted on south side of verge. Dianella flowering September-October 2022. This is blue tongue territory. Sweet peas in foreground, Doryanthes excelsa – Gymea

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July Flower Hunt

This morning, we went for a flower hunt to see how many different flowers there were in the garden, including the verge. Here’s the list: Acacia Fimbriata (Brisbane Wattle) is coming into flower. In the morning sun, it is abuzz. Also popular with birds of all sizes Subtropical Nectarine blossom Graptophyllum ilicifolium (Holly Fuchsia) popular

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What is Greenspace, anyway?

In debates about the environment, urban planning and development, the need for greenspace is a bit of an accepted wisdom. “Protect our greenspace” is the one argument against a new development that nobody dares argue with. But what do people really mean when they talk about greenspace? Does everyone mean the same thing? Do they

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Verge Garden – Native bed around the Street Tree

With the street tree planted in late April, the cooler weather and recent rain meant that May was the month for completing Stage 3 of the verge. It is the largest part, between the concrete path and the kerb.  The traffic calming means that I don’t have to worry about people alighting from parked cars

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Putting the Native Back into Nature Strips

On Friday, our new street tree was installed in line with the blue dot by two friendly workmen from the BCC.  They called it a “Lop Con” short for Lophostemon confertus (Queensland Brush Box), and it’s the same as the others in the street. One neighbour who is also missing a tree has already ordered

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Why I Won’t Be Growing An Edible Verge

I was among those who was delighted when the BCC came out with their new policy allowing verge gardens in 2016. But there were also complaints from the edible verge movement that it didn’t include lots of edible foods in its suggested plants. The guidelines didn’t forbid edibles, it just didn’t push their barrow. I

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