Planting for Wildlife

Chrysalis of an Orchard Swallowtail on Finger Lime

Today I noticed the finger lime in the front garden was almost leafless. At first I assumed it was another casualty of the flooding rains of early March 2022. But on closer inpection… I’d say this is the chrysalis of an Orchard Swallowtail butterfly. They’ve been breeding on the K-lime on the other side of

Chrysalis of an Orchard Swallowtail on Finger Lime Read More »

Callistemon Matthew Flinders

Matthew Flinders: Supposed to grow less than 1 metre high. Red bottlebrush flowers attract small honey eating birds to your garden.  Flowers are at their peak in late winter and spring but with some scattered flower throughout the year.  Prune after flowering – flowers on new growth Where: – 3 planted on verge in 2020

Callistemon Matthew Flinders Read More »

Front western garden

This is a very exposed spot, with winds from the south and winds from the west. The Acacia fimbriata split at a fork in the truck on a particularly gusty day so we lost half the tree. I cut off the side branch and the rest of the tree survived and now thrives. Other plants in the

Front western garden Read More »

Schoenoplectus mucronatus

Schoenoplectus mucronatus (Triangular Club Rush)

Erect Clumping Habit Perennial Herb Green triangular stems to 8 mm thick Pale Brown flowers and fruit in clustered spikelets to 20 mm Full Sun Soil/Conditions: Moist / Water to 50 cm Family: Cyperaceae Natural Habitat: Wetlands • Frog Habitat • Dam Edge Stablising Plant From Kumbartcho 6/10/2020 for new pond in front garden

Schoenoplectus mucronatus (Triangular Club Rush) Read More »

Glycosmis trifolata – Pink Lime Bush

Glycosmis trifoliata – known as Òrange Berry or Pink Lime Bush Rounded open habit, evergreen, perennial shrub to 4 Metres Full Sun / Semi-Shade Moist /Well-Drained Green glossy leaves to 15 cm long White flowers to 5 mm in clusters in Spring to Summer Pink soft berry fruit to 12 mm diameter Family: Rutaceae Natural Habitat: Dry

Glycosmis trifolata – Pink Lime Bush Read More »

Cissus antarctica (Kangaroo Vine)

Tubestock from Kumbartcho Nursery December 2019 Label says: Scrambling / Climbing Woody Vine or Ground Cover to 5 Metres, Evergreen Perennial, Bright Green leaves to 12 cm, Yellowish flowers to 5mm, Purplish-Black grape-like edible fruit Semi-Shade / Shade Soil/Conditions: Moist / Well-Drained Joseph’s Coat Moth Host Plant Bird Attracting Hanging Basket plant Indoor Plant Aboriginal

Cissus antarctica (Kangaroo Vine) Read More »

Pollinator Link

My garden – and verge – are part of the Brisbane Pollinator Link. Well, sort of. The Brisbane Pollinator Link is a great idea, aiming to have enough Brisbane gardens in close proximity to create connecting habitat for bees, butterflies and other bugs. But it’s based on the south side of the river, and one

Pollinator Link Read More »

What is Greenspace, anyway?

In debates about the environment, urban planning and development, the need for greenspace is a bit of an accepted wisdom. “Protect our greenspace” is the one argument against a new development that nobody dares argue with. But what do people really mean when they talk about greenspace? Does everyone mean the same thing? Do they

What is Greenspace, anyway? Read More »

Verge Garden – Native bed around the Street Tree

With the street tree planted in late April, the cooler weather and recent rain meant that May was the month for completing Stage 3 of the verge. It is the largest part, between the concrete path and the kerb.  The traffic calming means that I don’t have to worry about people alighting from parked cars

Verge Garden – Native bed around the Street Tree Read More »

Putting the Native Back into Nature Strips

On Friday, our new street tree was installed in line with the blue dot by two friendly workmen from the BCC.  They called it a “Lop Con” short for Lophostemon confertus (Queensland Brush Box), and it’s the same as the others in the street. One neighbour who is also missing a tree has already ordered

Putting the Native Back into Nature Strips Read More »

Why I Won’t Be Growing An Edible Verge

I was among those who was delighted when the BCC came out with their new policy allowing verge gardens in 2016. But there were also complaints from the edible verge movement that it didn’t include lots of edible foods in its suggested plants. The guidelines didn’t forbid edibles, it just didn’t push their barrow. I

Why I Won’t Be Growing An Edible Verge Read More »

Scroll to Top